What to Expect When You Donate Blood

We’ve all seen the blood-mobiles in office, school, or business parking lots, offering free t-shirts and a soda to anyone who will step up and donate. Donating blood can be a scary prospect, especially for someone who’s afraid of needles, but in the end, there is actually very little to worry about.

A form is filling out. To be able to be certain that your blood is safe for people to receive this form will ask questions. All the information is totally confidential, although some of these questions could be private, referring to your medical history. You can contact, if you feel like your blood shouldn’t be given to other people at.

A nurse will go over the form with you and next, you’ll be called into a side office and assess your vitals. This includes fever, blood pressure, and heartbeat. There’ll also be a finger-stick to check your blood’s iron levels. This is painful, but it’s over. If you’re deemed to contribute, you’ll be encouraged recline in one of those chairs that are donating and to step out of the workplace.

What to Expect When You Donate Blood

A nurse feels for a vein, apply a medical tourniquet, will clean the inside of your elbow with iodine, and insert the needle. Most people today find this painless. The tourniquet is going to be eliminated when the needle is in, and you might be asked to be able to encourage the blood circulation to pump your fist many times.

There are no side effects, although you might feel lightheaded after donating. The nurse will wrap your elbow and instruct you to keep it on for hours, drink enough fluids, and avoid exercise as soon as you’ve finished donating.